Cycling down the path of life

BodyFloat Kicks Off

 

Saddle fatigue is painful and can affect all of us; even the most hardy. Cirrus Cycles of Bellingham, Washington has engineered a solution they call the BodyFloat, and first indications are that it is set to revolutionize the bicycle landscape, giving all of us a more comfortable riding experience.

Many systems have been developed to soften the impact of this universal cyclist adversity. Depending on your style of riding these innovations have resulted in varying degrees of success: padded clothing, complicated suspension systems, topical ointments, geometry adjustments, tire widths and pressures, and countless more.

The BodyFloat solution is unique. It’s a dual spring parallelogram seat post mechanism that boasts being able to fit any rider, of any ability, on any bike. It works by levitating the rider over the bike in an adjustable travel range. It allows the seat to travel vertically thereby cushioning the rider from shocks and vibrations, which reduces discomfort and fatigue both during and after riding.

If the results of the BodyFloat Kickstarter campaign are any indication, you’ll be seeing a lot more of this innovation in your local bike shop and possibly installed as standard equipment on mainstream bike brands. It raised over $30,000 – enough to get the green light for funding. One group that spends long days in the saddle has already expressed interest, expect to see your police bicycle patrol using BodyFloat very soon.

Two models will be available: the 2.0 priced at $199 and the 3.0 priced at $349. Please check with Cirrus Cycles for distribution details.

 

BodyFloat

 

2 Comments

  1. I know my butt is worth it, but that is too expensive for me!

  2. Yes, it’s expensive. There are several bikes that can bought complete for less than the cost of this. It doesn’t seem to have uber complex workings nor is it made of high-end materials. Perhaps their research tells them there is a good market at that price? Let’s hope the price drifts down after launch, for the rest of us.